Discover the remarkable new spray-on coating that’s self-healing, water-repellent and ultra durable

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Discover the remarkable new spray-on coating that’s self-healing, water-repellent and ultra durable

Discover the remarkable new spray-on coating that’s self-healing, water-repellent and ultra durable

Researchers at the University of Michigan have developed a new spray-on coating that’s self-healing, water-repellent and, importantly, hundreds of times more durable than any other coating that’s currently available.

Countless hydrophobic coatings have been developed since the 1980s but their inherent lack of toughness has limited the potential applications for such coatings.

New self-healing water-repellent coating

The durability of the new coating opens the door to potential automotive, aerospace, construction, medical and marine applications.

Made from a combination of fluorinated polyurethane elastomer and a specialised water molecule, known as F-POSS, the coating can be sprayed onto virtually any substrate.

Once applied the coating produces a thin film rubbery texture and most remarkable of all; if damaged, the coating can heal itself hundreds of times over.

Astonishingly, researchers state that the regeneration characteristics of the coating are not impacted even if abraded, scratched, burned, plasma-cleaned, flattened, sonicated or chemically attacked.

The durability of the new coating is said to result from a different research method taken by the team at the University of Michigan.

Most hydrophobic coatings consist of two main ingredients; an active molecule that provides the water-repellency and a binder. The resulting surface of these coatings usually consists of a very specific geometry made out of microscopic pillars. Water droplets perch on the top of these pillars and create air pockets beneath, resulting in the water rolling off the surface easily. The problem with such a structure is that it is fragile – a slight abrasion and the surface can be damaged, becoming ineffective.

The pliable, rubbery surface generated by the new coating makes it far tougher and capable of bouncing back from damage.

The coating is currently being commercialised by HygraTek, an offshoot startup led by University of Michigan associate professor of materials science and engineering, Anish Tuteja.

 

Contact us now to discuss your coating and plating requirements further.

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